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How To Use Social Sites And A Blog to Establish Yourself As An Expert

So, you want to be known as an expert for your background, expertise, and knowledge. You've come to the right place. This page will show you how to get on the road to being an acknowledged expert in your field. Before we go any farther it's worthwhile to mention that this is not a shortcut for folks who do not have expert level skills. This is decidedly not a shortcut. You do need to possess first rate, expert level skills, and you will need to prove it. We can, and will, help you do that, but you simply got to have the goods.

 WordPress 
  
 Blogger 
  
 Typepad 
  
 Twitter 
  
 YouTube 
  
 LinkedIn 
 

Let's get started. You will need a Twitter account, and a working blog.

To obtain a Twitter account, if you don't already have one, follow this link Twitter.

To obtain a blog

There are many blog providers to choose from. Here are several:

LinkedIn is highly recommended.

A fully completed profile at LinkedIn helps you because that is the place for business people to be. So, head over to LinkedIn and complete your profile. To be perfectly candid, if you're not on LinkedIn people will wonder why. We highly recommend obtaining an account there.

Okay, you've got a Twitter account and a blog. Congratulations. We do hope all went well and you were not made crazy by the experience. Here, in a nut shell, is what you will be doing: you will use Twitter to drive traffic to your blog.

The Nitty Grity, How You Will Do This Specifically

You begin with your target audience and what they want and need to know because if you don't give then what they want you will fail utterly.

Creating A Client Persona

To assist you with defining your target reader, use a client personas. That's an excellent way to clearly define the person you're writing for. There are many ways to do this, here we'll talk about Joe Customer. This is published in our second book, When Social Networking Fails, Nine Steps to Social Networking Success.

Creating a customer persona is recording information about the demographics of your client. Record enough material so that you have an excellent picture of the person that you are creating content for.

Here is what you want to know about Joe:

  1. Name: Joe Client
  2. Is Joe a veteran?
  3. Can Joe refer business to you?
  4. Where did you make first contact with Joe?
  5. Why did Joe hire you, and not your competition?
  6. What will Joe use your product or service for?
  7. Is your product or service suitable for giving? If the answer is yes, do not neglect the gift market.
  8. Where does Joe live?
  9. What's Joe's age?
  10. Is Joe retired?
  11. What is Joe's approximate income?
  12. Is Joe married? Divorced?
  13. Does Joe have children, grandchildren? If yes, what are their age(s)? Gender? Do they live with Joe? Are they adults?
  14. What is Joe's level of education?
  15. What does Joe do for a living?
    • Work for hire?
    • Does Joe own a business?
    • Is this the only business Joe has owned/run/worked for? Does Joe have a business partner?
    • What does Joe's business sell?
    • How long at current business?
    • Has Joe worked in this industry for other businesses?
    • Is Joe social networking savvy?
      • Does Joe have a Website? A blog? Does Joe use online social networking?
      • Does Joe network in person?
      • Is Joe a member of a Chamber of Commerce? Business Network International (BNI), or other formal networking group?
      • How many business cards does Joe give out every year? We have included the different types of information below that may or may not be of use to you and the broad categories that the material falls into.
Demographic Customer Data

This is of data that deals with Joe's inherent characteristics. Capturing this data is important because it is often the most important of the six types we discuss.

  1. Age: Birth date or age range.
  2. Gender
  3. Race Ethnicity: Caucasian, African-American, Asian, Hispanic, biracial, multicultural, etceteras
  4. Religion: Catholic, Muslim, atheist, etceteras
  5. Marital status: Single, married, divorced, domestic partnership, etceteras
  6. Number of children: Zero, one, two, etceteras
  7. Level of education: None, high school, some college, college graduate, doctorate, life-experience, self-educated
  8. Occupation: Current and past jobs
  9. Income: Monetary range
  10. Nationality: American, French, Italian, British, Chinese etceteras
  11. Geography: Residence, work location, etceteras
Psychographic Customer Data

These factors measure aspects of Joe's personal life. This influences Joe's willingness get involved in your social networking campaign, or in any social networking campaign.

  1. Lifestyle: Parent with young children, grandparent, frequent flyer, empty-nester?
  2. World traveler or does Joe stay close to home? Frequency of travel and destination?
  3. Attitudes, interests, and beliefs.
  4. Political views.
  5. Interests, hobbies, and pass times.
  6. Will purchased products be for Joe's use, be a gift, or used in Joe's business?
  7. How often is your product used? Every day, week, month, or as needed?
Customer Preference Information

Joe's preferences online and offline are important for you to know about.

  1. The days of the week and the time of day that are best to reach Joe so that your message has a better chance of being read.
  2. How many times would Joe like you to contact him or her per week or month?
  3. What is Joe's preferred mode of contact? Is it your blog, E-mail, Twitter, Facebook, a video, what?
  4. Joe's mobile device. What is it, how do you access it?
Geographic Customer Data
  1. Where does Joe live? City, state, zip code, country. Own a home, condo, live in an apartment, with parents, have a room mate?
  2. Where did Joe and Josephine grow up?
  3. Where does he, she, they work?
Behavioral Data
  1. What are Joe's pertinent past decisions?
  2. What are Joe's likely future decisions?
  3. Does Joe procrastinate, or decide quickly?
  4. Is Joe an impulse buyer?
  5. Does Joe shop online?
Financial Data

This is really none of your business, so tread carefully. You may need to infer from related questions. For example, by knowing a zip code you can get a good idea of how expensive it is to live there. You may be able to ask things like:

  1. How many credit cards does Joe have?
  2. Did Joe ever miss a mortgage payment?
  3. Does Joe own a home, condo, or own more than one?
  4. What kind of a vehicle(s) does Joe drive? How old is/are it/they? Did Joe buy for transportation or eye candy?


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Writing Your Content

Ah, the written word. If you have never written before this will be a challenge, not because you can't write; although that's a possibility. But, because you will write too much, rather than too little. The rule when writing is to write for your reader; not for yourself, your staff, engineers, or sales people. No. You always write for the reader.

If you feel the need for some help, that goes beyond what we present below, look up our first book, it is designed for people just like you. It is available everywhere online and in bookstores.

Here Are Our Tips to Written Success

  1. Write at an eighth grade level. This is not an insult. Reading content is not like reading a book. Some professionals suggest writing at a sixth grade level. We feel that's too low.
  2. Use every day words and phrases. We know you're smart, you are an expert after all. the thrust of your effort is to communicate effectively, quickly, and easily.
  3. Avoid professional jargon at all costs. Never assume that the reader knows what non standard language means.
  4. Use listing when more than three items are to be included in a sentence. Listing is an excellent technique. you can see that we use it extensively in this document.
  5. Use proper punctuation.
    • Capitalize the first letter of every sentence.
    • End each sentence with period, question mark, or exclamation point.
    • Speaking of exclamation points " ! " use them sparingly. Do not rely on one to create emphasis. Your writing must do that. In fact, try not to use them at all.
  6. Edit and spell check ruthlessly. Don't trust the spell checker because it can't find words that are spelled correctly but are the wrong word.
    • Wrong: The rat chased the cat.
    • Right: The cat chased the rat.
    • Both sentences are composed of correctly spelled words yet the first is not what you intend.
  7. Do not use vulgar, profane, sexist, or racist language. Not ever. Just don't. It has no place in professional writing.
  8. Do not use humor. Writing humor is dangerous. Things that we take as humor in the United States can be highly insulting in other parts of the world. I discuss this at length in Web Content Rx, A Quick and Handy guide for Writers, Webmasters, eBayers, and Business People
  9. Do not write inside jokes that only one or two people will understand the meaning of. Never intentionally exclude portions of your audience from the true meaning of your words.
  10. Use headings and sub headings so the people can quickly find what they're looking for.
  11. The fist sentence in a paragraph must introduce material in that paragraph. Never mention something in one paragraph and not discuss it until later. when you open a paragraph with a topic, discuss it, or begin discussing it, right there.
  12. Sentence length is 12 to 15 words. Those of you who write for academia will write much longer sentences. that's fine for academia, not for the general public or for business.
  13. Paragraph length is five or six sentences. Six if the sentences are short. Five when your sentences are longer.
  14. The best thing of all is to write often. Writing every day is best, but the more you write, the better you'll get.

A good way to present your content is on Portable Document Format (PDF) files when yo want to be able to send material or use it for downloading. Of course, when used on a Website you will want it in HTML format.

When you're going to blog your words, you can simply write them in a wordprocessor and then cut and paste the work into the blog. You can do the same thing for Facebook. Twitter has a serious restriction on your character count (140 characters) so, you will likely want to write your material there.

When it comes to constructing your content yo uneed to decide up front why you're writing the content, what point it's going to make, and roughly how long it will be. When it comes to length, less is more. Avoid long documents.



Creating and Editing Your Videos

You will not doubt notice that we include YouTube in the text of this document, and its graphic above, but not in the title of this page. That's because many of you will not use video, but for those that do this section will be helpful. First of all, be sure to integrate our videos into your overall effort. If you use video exclusively, which we do not recommend, you won't need to concern yourself as there is nothing else to incorporate.

You will need to create an account and a channel for your videos. Not difficult at all. Now, place your videos here, and then copy and past the embed code into our blog. Now when anyone visits your blog your videos will appear there and play just fine, while being physically located at YouTube.

To copy the embed code:

Using video only means that you are a video blogger. So, Tweet your blog, and be sure to SEO, Search Engine Optimize your videos with keywords that people are searching for to find content like yours. This is done on your YouTube Channel, and in the title of your videos and the surrounding information available to you on YouTube's Info and Settings panel.

To access Info and Settings, you must first log into your YouTube Channel. then its just a matter of playing each video and clicking on Info and Settings > Basic Info and Advanced Settings.




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